Alexandra Leslie’s interest in website administration was sparked in her teens, priming her for a fast-paced career in managing, building, and contributing to online brands, including HostingAdvice, Forbes, and the blogs of prominent hosting providers. She brings to the table firsthand experience in reviewing web hosts, perfecting website design, optimizing content, and walking site owners through the steps that add up to a successful online presence. Today, she combines her extensive writing experience with technical understanding to unpack some of the most complex topics that daunt novice website owners, as well as the subjects that excite veteran technologists within the HostingAdvice readership.
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The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is the organization that governs the rules and regulations for domain name registrations. ICANN requires, for various reasons including to determine ownership of a domain should a dispute transpire, that a publicly accessible database be maintained that contains the contact information of all domain registrants. In layman's terms this means your domain name will be searchable by anyone and those search results will include your full name, physical address and other contact information. In order to protect your privacy in this regard, Domain.com offers WHOIS Domain Privacy which then masks your information using our own and implements a procedure for you to control who is able to then gain access to your contact information via a WHOIS search. Whenever you buy a domain name, no matter what domain name registration service you use, you are subject to the same ICANN rules, for this reason it is important to use a reputable service who cares about your privacy. Domain.com always recommends enabling WHOIS Domain Privacy.

NameStall is a $10 per month domain generator that stands out by allowing you to curate highly customized domain lists. Input a search term, and then customize the list by choosing various criteria. For example, you can choose to include only nouns, or focus on niches like real estate, transportation, design, or travel and hospitality. You can also choose from among 100-plus extensions. NameStall is best for companies needing niche-specific domain names.
Many online shops have the number 24 in them, to signify 24 hours a day – you may also be able to integrate numbers into your domain in a meaningful way to make them unique. Be careful though, because many cultures attach a lot of significance to certain numbers. Make sure that your number doesn't represent bad luck or other negative things in the country you're operating in.
GoDaddy’s $1-hosting plans are an absolute steal in affordable email hosting. You may already know them as the world’s top domain name registrar, and they’re known throughout the industry for their domain, email, and shared hosting plans. With award-winning customer support, unlimited email accounts, and simple setup options, GoDaddy is the leader in cheap email hosting.
Our email hosting plans come with an efficient spam filter and an additional virus scanner is available. You can also create blacklists and whitelists to customize your spam protection. Our security systems are always up to date and react immediately to security threats, providing robust email virus protection in accordance with the highest security standards.

Contact the owner. Before so much as hinting at a price, simply email to ask whether or not the domain is for sale. If you are known or can clearly be linked to a thriving business, create a generic alternate email address through which to contact them, as your success might be leveraged against you. Be aware, however, that an informal-sounding email address is more likely to be regarded as spam or junk mail.
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