Our WhoIs lookup is designed to help you perform a variety of whois lookup functions. WhoIs lets you perform a domain whois search, whois IP lookup and search the whois database for relevant information on domain registration and availability. This can help provide insight into a domain's history and additional information. Use WhoIs lookup anytime you want to perform a search to see who owns a domain name, how many pages from a site are listed with Google or even search WhoIs address listings for a website's owner.
When looking up a bare name in DNS, the network stack will add the search domains to it to form fully qualified domain names, and look up those as well.[8] For example, if the domain search list contains "wikipedia.org", typing "en" in the browser will direct the user to "en.wikipedia.org". Some ISPs add their own search domains via DHCP settings, similar to how they add DNS servers and other networking information; if this is undesired, the user can change this setting to ".local".
Instant Domain Search shows domain name search results as you type. Our domain checker automatically generates available domain names, shows aftermarket domains for sale, and shows domain availability for popular domain extensions—instantly! Great domain names are short, memorable, and easy to spell. Try not to use hyphens or numbers. A good place to start is what someone might type into a search engine to find your website. The domain name search results are sponsored. We earn money when you buy names and services from our partners like Go Daddy, Shopify, Wix, WordPress, and Domain.com.
You'll receive a WhoisGuard subscription absolutely FREE with every eligible domain registration or transfer. WhoisGuard subscription expiration is based on purchase date rather than activation date. WhoisGuard provides subscription pursuant to its Services Agreement with Namecheap. Terms and conditions apply. Visit the WhoisGuard page for details.

When you hear "end of support" for one of your core products, does that make you a little nervous? With Carbonite Migrate, you can take the stress out of an End-of-Support (EOS) deadline and choose how you want to extend your data's life. Whether modernizing that data into a newer OS/application, or moving the entire server workload into the Azure cloud, you'll have … Continue Reading...
You can find out if a domain name is available by searching at the top of this page. If the domain name you want is not available, try selecting a suggested alternative that appears or searching again. If you’re still stuck, our free guide, Bringing your business online: How to choose a domain name and more, provides some more in-depth information about domain names and helps guide you through the process.
The term "Web service" describes a standardized way of integrating Web-based applications using the XML, SOAP, WSDL and UDDI open standards over an Internet Protocol backbone. XML is the data format used to contain the data and provide metadata around it, SOAP is used to transfer the data, WSDL is used for describing the services available and UDDI lists what services are available.
A web service is a collection of open protocols and standards used for exchanging data between applications or systems. Software applications written in various programming languages and running on various platforms can use web services to exchange data over computer networks like the Internet in a manner similar to inter-process communication on a single computer. This interoperability (e.g., between Java and Python, or Windows and Linux applications) is due to the use of open standards.

Unlike traditional client/server models, such as a Web server/Web page system, Web services do not provide the user with a GUI. Web services instead share business logic, data and processes through a programmatic interface across a network. The applications interface, not the users. Developers can then add the Web service to a GUI (such as a Web page or an executable program) to offer specific functionality to users.


Web services are used for a variety of applications, but the most common is for reusing code and connecting existing programs. The web service method can help developers segment applications into components that can be used and reused for various needs. For example, more than one program might need a conversion tool or a reporting function. This is possible due to web services’ universal communication protocols.

A directory called UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration) defines which software system should be contacted for which type of data. So when one software system needs one particular report/data, it would go to the UDDI and find out which other systems it can contact for receiving that data. Once the software system finds out which other systems it should contact, it would then contact that system using a special protocol called SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol). The service provider system would first validate the data request by referring to the WSDL file, and then process the request and send the data under the SOAP protocol.
W3C Web Services may use SOAP over HTTP protocol, allowing less costly (more efficient) interactions over the Internet than via proprietary solutions like EDI/B2B. Besides SOAP over HTTP, Web services can also be implemented on other reliable transport mechanisms like FTP. In a 2002 document, the Web Services Architecture Working Group defined a Web services architecture, requiring a standardized implementation of a "Web service."
Web services are almost like normal a web page. The difference is that they are formatted to make it very easy for a program to pull data from the page, to the point of probably not using any HTML. They generally also are more reliable as to the consistency of the format, may use a different formal process to define the content such soap or raw xml, and there is often also a descriptor document that formally defines the structure for the data.
^ Compare: Oya 2008, "Under the current Web Services, […] stakeholder systems must follow the predefined rules for a particular business service including those about business protocols to send/receive messages and about system operation. […] More flexible mechanism is desired where freely built and autonomously running systems can exchange business messages without pre-agreed strict rules. We call it Autonomous Web Services (AWS) and proposed the framework called Dynamic Model Harmonization (DMH) with its algorithm, which dynamically adjusts different business process models between systems […]."[4]
A web service is any piece of software that makes itself available over the internet and uses a standardized XML messaging system. XML is used to encode all communications to a web service. For example, a client invokes a web service by sending an XML message, then waits for a corresponding XML response. As all communication is in XML, web services are not tied to any one operating system or programming language—Java can talk with Perl; Windows applications can talk with Unix applications.
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