Interoperability amongst applications - Web services allow various applications to talk to each other and share data and services among themselves. All types of applications can talk to each other. So instead of writing specific code which can only be understood by specific applications, you can now write generic code that can be understood by all applications 

W3C Web Services may use SOAP over HTTP protocol, allowing less costly (more efficient) interactions over the Internet than via proprietary solutions like EDI/B2B. Besides SOAP over HTTP, Web services can also be implemented on other reliable transport mechanisms like FTP. In a 2002 document, the Web Services Architecture Working Group defined a Web services architecture, requiring a standardized implementation of a "Web service."
Synchronous or Asynchronous functionality- Synchronicity refers to the binding of the client to the execution of the service. In synchronous operations, the client will actually wait for the web service to complete an operation. An example of this is probably a scenario wherein a database read and write operation are being performed. If data is read from one database and subsequently written to another, then the operations have to be done in a sequential manner. Asynchronous operations allow a client to invoke a service and then execute other functions in parallel. This is one of the common and probably the most preferred techniques for ensuring that other services are not stopped when a particular operation is being carried out.
A web service is a collection of open protocols and standards used for exchanging data between applications or systems. Software applications written in various programming languages and running on various platforms can use web services to exchange data over computer networks like the Internet in a manner similar to inter-process communication on a single computer. This interoperability (e.g., between Java and Python, or Windows and Linux applications) is due to the use of open standards (XML, SOAP, HTTP).
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