An email address identifies an email box to which email messages are delivered. A wide variety of formats were used in early email systems, but only a single format is used today, following the specifications[a] developed for Internet mail systems since the 1980s. This article uses the term email address to refer to the addr-spec defined in RFC 5322, not to the address that is commonly used; the difference is that an address may contain a display name, a comment, or both.
Post initial setup, a primary concern will be the log-on issue. If your organization is fine with a separate log-on for your email provider, then this step will be quick. However, that's not typically what businesses want or users expect. In general, users expect to sign onto their desktops and have their email and file sharing sign-ons happen as part of that one-step process. Not surprisingly, this is called Single Sign-On (SSO) and it's enabled in one of three ways: through the use of a back-end directory service like Microsoft Active Directory (AD); an identity management service, like Okta (one of our Editors' Choice winners in that category); or several compatible web services that include SSO along with other apps and email services, like Google G Suite Business and Microsoft Office 365 Business Premium (two of the top providers reviewed here). Which method you choose depends on how your business is configured today and your long-term cloud services strategy. It's definitely a conversation you'll need to have either with your in-house IT staff or your outside IT consultant. 

The transmission of electronic mail within the Internet uses the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP), defined in RFC 5321 and 5322, and extensions like RFC 6531. The mailboxes may be accessed and managed by users with the Post Office Protocol (POP) or the Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) with email client software that runs on a personal computer, mobile device, or with webmail systems that render the messages on a screen or on paper printouts.
PCMag, PCMag.com and PC Magazine are among the federally registered trademarks of Ziff Davis, LLC and may not be used by third parties without explicit permission. The display of third-party trademarks and trade names on this site does not necessarily indicate any affiliation or the endorsement of PCMag. If you click an affiliate link and buy a product or service, we may be paid a fee by that merchant.
The bottom line is that if you have paid money to own a domain then you should, at the least, buy from a domain registrar that offers email forwarding for their accounts (we prefer Namecheap who do include free email forwarding). You can also create a domain email address from the cpanel given to you by your hosting providers—they’ll also provide at least one free email address for your account.
Register your domain name at CheapDomain.com and enjoy rock-bottom prices year after year. Check out all you get - FREE with your domain. You'll get free domain forwarding and masking. With free domain forwarding you can direct any domain name you own to your website -- anyone who types that domain name into their browser is taken directly to your website. All domains also come with free email forwarding, domain locking, total DNS control, change of registration, status alerts and more.. You also save with our special discount prices on Web Hosting and Website Builder, as well as WordPress Hosting. AND.. we offer some of the lowest prices you'll find anywhere on domain renewals. Transfer your domain names to CheapDomain.com today and start saving!
If you want to be safe, go with something like [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], or [email protected] Sure, there will always be exceptions to the rule (if two people have the exact same name, maybe you can force them into a Hunger Games-type situation), but doing what you can to avoid future duplication will make your life much easier later.
When you need help, you can expect the best from us. For five years in a row, GoDaddy has won a Stevie Award for Customer Service. The international awards competition is based on Customer Net Promoter Scores (NPS), which consistently rank our customer care among the best on earth. In addition to phone support, we also offer an exhaustive collection of help articles on every conceivable topic.
Line speed, billed on the 95th percentile, refers to the speed in which data flows from the server or device, measured every 5 minutes for the month, and dropping the top 5% of measurements that are highest, and basing the usage for the month on the next-highest measurement. This is similar to a median measurement, which can be thought of as a 50th percentile measurement (with 50% of measurements above, and 50% of measurements below), whereas this sets the cutoff at 95th percentile, with 5% of measurements above the value, and 95% of measurements below the value. This is also known as Burstable billing. Line speed is measured in bits per second (or kilobits per second, megabits per second or gigabits per second).
A personalised email address on your domain like [email protected] increases the value and perception of the professionality of your business to customers and prospects. While free email services offered by Google, Yahoo, etc. are fine for personal use, a custom email address will prove that you are a professional or legitimate business. If you already have a hosting plan with one.com, your personalised email address comes as part of the hosting package completely free of charge.
Forwarded email addresses are sometimes called “aliases”. An alias, as you know, is another name that refers to a given person. In our example, John has an email address with gmail—[email protected] He has just purchased the domain name widgets.com and sets up a forwarding rule which “reads”: Whenever an email comes in to [email protected], forward that email to [email protected] In this case, the address [email protected] is an “alias” for [email protected], as all email goes to the same Gmail address.
HostingAdvice.com is a free online resource that offers valuable content and comparison services to users. To keep this resource 100% free for users, we receive advertising compensation from the hosts listed on this page. Along with key review factors, this compensation may impact how and where hosts appear on the page (including, for example, the order in which they appear). HostingAdvice.com does not include listings for all web hosts.
This is how I started doing hosted e-mails, but I recently switched to using Google Apps. If you have a small business (up to 10 users), you can use Google Apps 100% free. Gmail handles the mail, your e-mail has your domain associated with it, and you can link that e-mail up to other Google features (Google docs, Google voice, add-on apps like a CRM or accounting). Best of all, I can sync it all effortlessly with my android phone, so now all of my e-mails still come to my phone… but they’re sorted neatly by account.

An email address such as [email protected] is made up of a local-part, an @ symbol, then a case-insensitive domain. Although the standard requires[1] the local part to be case-sensitive, it also urges that receiving hosts deliver messages in a case-independent fashion,[2] e.g., that the mail system at example.com treat John.Smith as equivalent to john.smith; some mail systems even treat them as equivalent to johnsmith.[3] Mail systems often limit their users' choice of name to a subset of the technically valid characters, and in some cases also limit which addresses it is possible to send mail to.
×