If you want to be safe, go with something like [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], or [email protected] Sure, there will always be exceptions to the rule (if two people have the exact same name, maybe you can force them into a Hunger Games-type situation), but doing what you can to avoid future duplication will make your life much easier later. 

Hard disk drives, or HDDs, are traditional storage devices that use spinning disks to house data. Solid-state drives, or SSDs, store data on microchips instead, so they can load that data much quicker. NVMe stands for Non-Volatile Memory Express, and is the latest, fastest technology that SSDs use to access data. If you need faster data read and write speeds, you should choose SSD storage, perhaps with NVMe for the very best performance. If, however, overall data capacity is a higher priority, an HDD server can still offer outstanding performance and value.
The reason I ask is due to Barbara’s question about changing email provider as she has her own business domain, a web site and emails ending (say @xxx.com). If she changed email provider then using your analogy, then the hard-working mail team might be a team of contractors handling all her mail and then if she changes to a different provider then that would be equivalent to the old team being fired and new team of contractors put in their place. So same address, same building, same mail boy delivering it to your desk but a new mail room team. Would that be correct?
It’s pretty much common knowledge that Gmail is awesome. It’s fast, connects seamlessly with the rest of your Google services such as Drive, has a cool app called Inbox, and is overall an extremely powerful email service. However, to use it with a custom domain, you need to purchase Google Apps for either $5 or $10/month, which for casual users is a bit unnecessary. On top of that, you don’t even get all of the features a personal account gets, e.g. Inbox.
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What about the time you clicked on that PayPal link that wasn't really a PayPal link? "Phishing" is a term applied to either websites or emails that pretend to be something they're not in hopes of getting a user to click on something they should have ignored. This tactis is done in hopes of then getting users to provide confidential information they would have otherwise kept to themselves, typically like passwords, financial information, or other personal data. While there are security measure that fight this, the mechanics behind phishing are, unfortunately, also consistently becoming more sophisticated. Even some dedicated antivirus and business-class hosted endpoint protection suites are having trouble keeping up.

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When delivering email, an SMTP client, e.g., Mail User Agent (MUA), Mail Transfer Agent (MTA), uses the domain name system (DNS) to look up a Resource Record (RR) for the recipient's domain (the part of the email address to the right of the @); if there is a mail exchange Resource Record (MX record) then the returned MX record contains the name of the recipient's mailserver, otherwise the SMTP client uses an address record (A or AAAA). The MTA next connects to this server as an SMTP client. The local part of an email address has no significance for intermediate mail relay systems other than the final mailbox host. Email senders and intermediate relay systems must not assume it to be case-insensitive, since the final mailbox host may or may not treat it as such. A single mailbox may receive mail for multiple email addresses, if configured by the administrator. Conversely, a single email address may be the alias to a distribution list to many mailboxes. Email aliases, electronic mailing lists, sub-addressing, and catch-all addresses, the latter being mailboxes that receive messages regardless of the local part, are common patterns for achieving a variety of delivery goals.
Nice article about how easy it is to set up an email. I do have a question though. If readers follow the steps that are outlined above, don’t your response emails say something along the lines of “sent on behalf of [email protected] by [email protected]“? This would still expose your main private email and still doesn’t look quite as professional. Wouldn’t it be better to implement google apps?
Nice, easy to follow post Kashish. Not using an email address that represents your domain name is a lost opportunity and one of the most common mistakes that I see online. I mention this quite a bit on my blog but I’ve never created an article like this one before. I’m sending my blog readers her in the comment section of my most recent posts. Thanks! I found this at the perfect time.
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