Nice article but Google Aps is the best in this case as you get a lot of other features like Google docs, calendar and others, just like a Gmail account. You can then share any docs with another gmail account holder & the database is huge for an email account. More importantly, you can create up-to 10 users & you’ll have full control over all those email accounts. It’s free, easy to integrate & no hassle. Just you need to follow what’s in http://www.google.com/a, change your MX entry from your site’s cPanel (under mail section), activate the email account from google apps, wait for a few hours & you’re done. You got your own domain email id under fast and secure google server. Good article by the way.
The reason I ask is due to Barbara’s question about changing email provider as she has her own business domain, a web site and emails ending (say @xxx.com). If she changed email provider then using your analogy, then the hard-working mail team might be a team of contractors handling all her mail and then if she changes to a different provider then that would be equivalent to the old team being fired and new team of contractors put in their place. So same address, same building, same mail boy delivering it to your desk but a new mail room team. Would that be correct?
Ultimately, it boils down to a balance between cost, features, and risk. It's always tempting to simply jump on the lowest-cost solution, but the fact that email is ubiquitous keeps this from being the smart play. It's nearly impossible to escape using it, which means your users, your customers, and the guts of your business have all come to depend on it in different ways. You need to discover those ways, evaluate them, and then choose a service that either meets or improves on them. This takes time, discussion with your IT staff, and some investigation; these are steps you don't want to skip. Otherwise, you'll pay for it later.
Many dedicated server providers include a service level agreement based on network up-time. Some dedicated server hosting providers offer a 100% up-time guarantee on their network. By securing multiple vendors for connectivity and using redundant hardware, providers are able to guarantee higher up-times; usually between 99-100% up-time if they are a higher quality provider. One aspect of higher quality providers is they are most likely to be multi-homed across multiple quality up-link providers, which in turn, provides significant redundancy in the event one goes down in addition to potentially improved routes to destinations.
For any business user or organization today, the decision to use email is a no-brainer. Business simply can't be done in many cases without it. But that doesn't mean you can interchange email platforms or service providers at will. Digging into the capabilities of these services reveals a great deal of additional feature scaffolding that surrounds almost every email implementation by necessity.

I used godaddy for a few years but grew tired of constant price hikes not to mention how difficult it was to edit my site. My site was deleted when I canceled my subscription and I can’t use my web site name unless I want to fork over almost $200. I don’t need online ordering as I’m a small home bakery, I don’t need one email address let alone 10, I just want an online presence so customers can find me. However, I want to be sure I’m buying something I can work with easily. Any suggestions?
Our aim is to keep our servers clean from malware, phishing, and other malicious activities posing threat to Internet users. It does not mean that we judge before knowing you, but today's reality is that we can not predict intentions of every user who signs up. In order to prevent misuse of our services we had to apply certain limitations to free hosting accounts. In turn our servers are never blacklisted so you can always expect your email message to reach it's recipient, and Internet users to reach your website.
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