After everyone has an individual account, be sure to create some general accounts for different roles. For example, it’s better to create a [email protected] account than to just have that email go to a specific person (what happens if that person leaves or takes on a new role within the company?). Don’t go overboard though—having too many email accounts can get confusing for everyone.
Well, depending on your email provider, you can often define several different email addresses that are all delivered into the same mailbox. For example, it’s not at all uncommon for various standard email addresses like “[email protected]”, “[email protected]”, “[email protected]” and so on, to all be delivered into the same mailbox – the mailbox of the administrator for that mail server. I actually go so far as to have many email addresses on my “askleo.com” domain, but only one account. All the email on that domain is delivered to that single account. (I then use rules and filters to sort the email, based on what address it was sent to.)
There are many uses for a dedicated server: big data, machine learning, website and application hosting, backups and storage, infrastructure virtualisation, server clusters, business applications (CRM, ERP), and even online game hosting. This is why we offer several different dedicated server ranges, each of which are designed for a specific set of needs. Our sales and support teams will help you with your project, and can offer expert advice on which server to choose.
When you need help, you can expect the best from us. For five years in a row, GoDaddy has won a Stevie Award for Customer Service. The international awards competition is based on Customer Net Promoter Scores (NPS), which consistently rank our customer care among the best on earth. In addition to phone support, we also offer an exhaustive collection of help articles on every conceivable topic.
The cloud certainly makes delivering email to your users easier but, for the vast majority of organizations, there's still going to be some setup required beyond simply activating the service. At a minimum, a domain must be purchased and configured to point to the new email host. The service provider can make this process very simple or they can make quite hard; this is something you should watch for in the provider's customer support forums as well as in our reviews. In most cases, there is a validation phase that will require some technical familiarity, though a few providers go so far as to walk even neophyte users through it step by step. Other solid services bolster excellent support with tutorial articles and videos that also walk you through the process. The worst will leave you to figure it out on your own.
Even if you’re not running a burgeoning business, there’s the personal branding component to what an email host can offer. Maybe you’re a graduate student building your personal portfolio and publishing your resumé online when your realize Corporate Hiring Managers are less likely to respond to [email protected] Wouldn’t it be nice to reach out from [email protected] instead? Or maybe you’re establishing a side biz to bring in some extra cash. Would you rather folks considering you for freelance work reach out to [email protected] or [email protected]?
Your next major concern will be compatibility. It's not a shock that most businesses run on Microsoft Windows and use some form of Microsoft Office. Being able to use common third-party clients such as Microsoft Outlook can often be a concern, and even today, compatibility with Microsoft Outlook isn't necessarily guaranteed. This is especially true when sending and receiving meeting invites. It only takes one garbled meeting invite to realize how frustrating this can be in the real world. Even if using Microsoft Outlook isn't a concern, portability is. If the service is entirely web-based, then is there a means for me to take my email offline and send email when I connect?
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