If you’re on a quest for high quality email hosting, you’ve probably got one of two motives: Either you’re a business owner in need of a professional means to communicate with clients and company contacts, or you’re an individual establishing your personal brand. In either case, you want a reliable email service, unlimited resources, and, ideally, a free domain at which to host your email accounts. 

An example here is the rapidly growing trend of "inbox zero." It's actually known by a variety of names, but it refers to the practice of keeping your email inbox count at zero stored emails. Essentially, it's dealing with every email as it comes in and then deleting or archiving each one so that your inbox is always empty. This boils down to a fundamental shift in how users are utilizing their email inboxes.
To date, no industry standards have been set to clearly define the management role of dedicated server providers. What this means is that each provider will use industry standard terms, but each provider will define them differently. For some dedicated server providers, fully managed is defined as having a web based control panel while other providers define it as having dedicated system engineers readily available to handle all server and network related functions of the dedicated server provider.
Having so much email storage means that you’ve got room for thousands of emails. Hunting for one that you need could be an issue. Our search system makes it simple to find what you’re looking for, plus it’s easy to use. And when you’re able to find things in your archives, it makes your life easier and more productive. That’s a winning combination.
If you’re on a quest for high quality email hosting, you’ve probably got one of two motives: Either you’re a business owner in need of a professional means to communicate with clients and company contacts, or you’re an individual establishing your personal brand. In either case, you want a reliable email service, unlimited resources, and, ideally, a free domain at which to host your email accounts.
Well, depending on your email provider, you can often define several different email addresses that are all delivered into the same mailbox. For example, it’s not at all uncommon for various standard email addresses like “[email protected]”, “[email protected]”, “[email protected]” and so on, to all be delivered into the same mailbox – the mailbox of the administrator for that mail server. I actually go so far as to have many email addresses on my “askleo.com” domain, but only one account. All the email on that domain is delivered to that single account. (I then use rules and filters to sort the email, based on what address it was sent to.)
Interpretation of the local part of an email address is dependent on the conventions and policies implemented in the mail server. For example, case sensitivity may distinguish mailboxes differing only in capitalization of characters of the local-part, although this is not very common.[13] Apart from work, school, or organization addresses, gmail ignores all dots in the local-part for the purposes of determining account identity.[14] This prevents the creation of user accounts your.user.name or yourusername when the account your.username already exists.
Availability, price and employee familiarity often determines which operating systems are offered on dedicated servers. Variations of Linux and Unix (open source operating systems) are often included at no charge to the customer. Commercial operating systems include Microsoft Windows Server, provided through a special program called Microsoft SPLA. Red Hat Enterprise is a commercial version of Linux offered to hosting providers on a monthly fee basis. The monthly fee provides OS updates through the Red Hat Network using an application called Yum. Other operating systems are available from the open source community at no charge. These include CentOS, Fedora Core, Debian, and many other Linux distributions or BSD systems FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD.
The flip side of that coin is specialization. Many operators believe that hosted email services are useful mainly to companies interested only in general-purpose email use and that any specialized application requires an in-house deployment. This might be true depending on the app but it might not depending on the capabilities offered by the hosted email provider. Email marketing is a great example. Some hosted email providers have special service suites aimed specifically at email marketers, many of whom can send out thousands of emails per month, focused not so much on communication as they are on marketing. These service providers deliver more than just volume, too, as they also offer custom email creation tools and sophisticated marketing and tracking metrics.
Availability, price and employee familiarity often determines which operating systems are offered on dedicated servers. Variations of Linux and Unix (open source operating systems) are often included at no charge to the customer. Commercial operating systems include Microsoft Windows Server, provided through a special program called Microsoft SPLA. Red Hat Enterprise is a commercial version of Linux offered to hosting providers on a monthly fee basis. The monthly fee provides OS updates through the Red Hat Network using an application called Yum. Other operating systems are available from the open source community at no charge. These include CentOS, Fedora Core, Debian, and many other Linux distributions or BSD systems FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD.

Dedicated hosting server providers utilize extreme security measures to ensure the safety of data stored on their network of servers. Providers will often deploy various software programs for scanning systems and networks for obtrusive invaders, spammers, hackers, and other harmful problems such as Trojans, worms, and crashers (Sending multiple connections). Linux and Windows use different software for security protection.


This is where an email host like SiteGround can be a winning deal for individuals. SiteGround will give you a free domain name, where you get unlimited email hosting that’s compatible with most all major email and webmail clients (RoundCube, Outlook, SquirrelMail, etc.). Your email is secured with integrated anti-SPAM protection, and you can easily manage your account via cPanel, the web’s leading control panel for hosting.
Interpretation of the local part of an email address is dependent on the conventions and policies implemented in the mail server. For example, case sensitivity may distinguish mailboxes differing only in capitalization of characters of the local-part, although this is not very common.[13] Apart from work, school, or organization addresses, gmail ignores all dots in the local-part for the purposes of determining account identity.[14] This prevents the creation of user accounts your.user.name or yourusername when the account your.username already exists. 

I’ve registered a domain name at godaddy and want to set up email using that. I do not want to simply forward the email to my gmail, I want something solid set up using that domain name that is separate from gmail or any other account I use. Above, step 1 says to “Log into your blog hosting control panel, or cpanel.”? What is that? Step 1 lost me . Is that something from GoDaddy?
Most dedicated servers are packaged with a control panel. Control panels are often confused with management tools, but these control panels are actually web based automation tools created to help automate the process of web site creation and server management. Control panels should not be confused with a full server management solution by a dedicated hosting providers.

One great way to protect data is by using email encryption. This feature can do wonders for protecting your organization's privacy and that of your employees, but it demands some investigation when you're selecting your provider. Is it built-in or do you require a third-party tool? Does it use common standards that the recipient can process? What about Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificates? Are they included or do they need to be purchased separately? The best-in-class tools will not only make encryption easy for anybody to configure and use, buy they'll also make it easy for you to understand pre-purchase.


Before registering a domain, it is necessary to choose your desired name. That is the most crucial step. Once you have done so, you can use the domain check at the top of this page to help you find out, if your website address is available or if it is already in use. In case all your preferred names are already under management, you can choose a completely new one or try another extension.
Your next major concern will be compatibility. It's not a shock that most businesses run on Microsoft Windows and use some form of Microsoft Office. Being able to use common third-party clients such as Microsoft Outlook can often be a concern, and even today, compatibility with Microsoft Outlook isn't necessarily guaranteed. This is especially true when sending and receiving meeting invites. It only takes one garbled meeting invite to realize how frustrating this can be in the real world. Even if using Microsoft Outlook isn't a concern, portability is. If the service is entirely web-based, then is there a means for me to take my email offline and send email when I connect?
Think of the name you want to register. The answer is typically your company or website name. It is best to keep your domain name short and easy to understand. Say it out loud, and make sure it sounds great. Next, search to see if it is available. If the name you desire is taken with the .com top-level domain, there are hundreds of others available. Finally, add the top choices to your cart and complete the domain registration.

But your service provider isn't your only worry. If you've opted for any third-party email integration, like combining your email with a third-party customer relationship management (CRM) provider (such as Salesforce), that opens your company's email up to either data-snooping apps deployed by Salesforce or to any data breaches that originate with that service. So the more informed you can be about what's attached to your email service, how that data's being used and accessed and especially by whom, the better off you'll be when it comes time to send confidential email.

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