After everyone has an individual account, be sure to create some general accounts for different roles. For example, it’s better to create a [email protected] account than to just have that email go to a specific person (what happens if that person leaves or takes on a new role within the company?). Don’t go overboard though—having too many email accounts can get confusing for everyone.


A survey conducted (see graphic above; click to enlarge) by email marketing software provider and consulting service ReachMail Media Services of over 1,000 respondents found that varying percentages of different worker generations attempted to adhere to "inbox zero," while other generations actually preferred using their inboxes as personal information managers.
Setting up a business email address on your domain has lots of branding and administrative advantages. Think of your business email as a marketing tool – it’s likely the first impression your clients will get from you when you initiate contact. Using your domain in the email address means prospects and customers have an immediate reference point as to who you are and can search for your business online. By contrast, sending emails from a free email service such as Google or Yahoo will diminish your credibility and professionalism.
Email hosting is a specialist internet hosting service which operates email servers. Hosting your email with one.com means you can benefit from premium services such as an ad-free interface, email on your own domain, spam and virus protection as well as black and white lists. Your email, calendar and contacts are also accessible via webmail in any browser, so your work can travel with you.
The flip side of that coin is specialization. Many operators believe that hosted email services are useful mainly to companies interested only in general-purpose email use and that any specialized application requires an in-house deployment. This might be true depending on the app but it might not depending on the capabilities offered by the hosted email provider. Email marketing is a great example. Some hosted email providers have special service suites aimed specifically at email marketers, many of whom can send out thousands of emails per month, focused not so much on communication as they are on marketing. These service providers deliver more than just volume, too, as they also offer custom email creation tools and sophisticated marketing and tracking metrics.
You can certainly do that, but it’s often a lot of effort. Not sure it it’s worth it. Even when you narrow it down to one contact – it may not be that one contact at all, but something about his or her email provider, the path to that email provider or something else. It’s difficult (and inadvisable) to point fingers. On the other hand, it’s fairly common when signing up for mailing lists, or leaving comments on web sites that require an email address to use a specific email address to see if THEY end up spamming you. People use Ask Leo! – specific email addresses when leaving comments all the time. (And, no, I don’t spam ’em 🙂 ).
Your next major concern will be compatibility. It's not a shock that most businesses run on Microsoft Windows and use some form of Microsoft Office. Being able to use common third-party clients such as Microsoft Outlook can often be a concern, and even today, compatibility with Microsoft Outlook isn't necessarily guaranteed. This is especially true when sending and receiving meeting invites. It only takes one garbled meeting invite to realize how frustrating this can be in the real world. Even if using Microsoft Outlook isn't a concern, portability is. If the service is entirely web-based, then is there a means for me to take my email offline and send email when I connect?
If you want to be safe, go with something like [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], or [email protected] Sure, there will always be exceptions to the rule (if two people have the exact same name, maybe you can force them into a Hunger Games-type situation), but doing what you can to avoid future duplication will make your life much easier later.
That's a big difference, with "inbox zero" requiring an email client with great archiving that works over multiple device types. Meanwhile, at the other end of the spectrum, the personal information managers need something more like Microsoft Outlook, with excellent search capabilities as well as a good storage contract on the hosting side because these types of inboxes are often tens of gigabytes (GB) per user.
It’s pretty much common knowledge that Gmail is awesome. It’s fast, connects seamlessly with the rest of your Google services such as Drive, has a cool app called Inbox, and is overall an extremely powerful email service. However, to use it with a custom domain, you need to purchase Google Apps for either $5 or $10/month, which for casual users is a bit unnecessary. On top of that, you don’t even get all of the features a personal account gets, e.g. Inbox.
A survey conducted (see graphic above; click to enlarge) by email marketing software provider and consulting service ReachMail Media Services of over 1,000 respondents found that varying percentages of different worker generations attempted to adhere to "inbox zero," while other generations actually preferred using their inboxes as personal information managers.
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That has interesting implications: it means you can control what email gets downloaded when by having more than one account. I could separate askleo.com into two accounts, for example: one for the email addresses I want to pay attention to quickly, and the other for things that aren’t as critical. You could also segregate email based on which address it was sent to, which is what I do with my askleo.com email.
By processing email, I mean that email directed at some address “@” (at) one of those domains is handled by a mail server or servers specifically for that domain. In fact, all the internet really knows is that “mail for this domain is is handled by that server”. Sometimes it’s the same server as the web site – for example, as I write this, mail for “askleo.com” is handled by “askleo.com”. But sometimes it’s not – mail for “hotmail.com” is actually handled by four different servers, “mx1.hotmail.com” through “mx4.hotmail.com”.
The configurations used for our dedicated hosting solution are designed to suit professional needs. Depending on your usage, you might need a configuration with more RAM, bigger storage space, or a higher processing capacity. Furthermore, the different OVH dedicated server ranges are distinguished by their bandwidth capacity and range of associated services. You can also get anti-DDoS protection adapted for online gaming, a private network (vRack) with up to 10 Gb/s to allow you to connect your dedicated server to your infrastructure, or even hardware RAID. Choose the dedicated server that fits your needs.
This is how I started doing hosted e-mails, but I recently switched to using Google Apps. If you have a small business (up to 10 users), you can use Google Apps 100% free. Gmail handles the mail, your e-mail has your domain associated with it, and you can link that e-mail up to other Google features (Google docs, Google voice, add-on apps like a CRM or accounting). Best of all, I can sync it all effortlessly with my android phone, so now all of my e-mails still come to my phone… but they’re sorted neatly by account.
Running in-house email servers does provide more control and wider customization as well as tracking and compliance for small to midsize businesses (SMB). But they require specialized on-site IT staff as well as the need to manually manage and support both hardware and software. A third-party hosted email service matches many of the advantages of in-house email without the expensive initial investment. The ability to manage the number of users, access the latest security protocols, and enjoy ease of connectivity and deployment of hosted solutions makes it a viable and competitive option.
An example here is the rapidly growing trend of "inbox zero." It's actually known by a variety of names, but it refers to the practice of keeping your email inbox count at zero stored emails. Essentially, it's dealing with every email as it comes in and then deleting or archiving each one so that your inbox is always empty. This boils down to a fundamental shift in how users are utilizing their email inboxes.

Along with specialized uses for email, you should investigate how your users are emailing on a daily basis. Email has come a long way in 40 years and the way people use it has significantly evolved. That's important because it will impact the tools and features you need to look for in your hosted email provider's client software. Sure, Microsoft Outlook is still the most popular on-site email client, but a fast-increasing number of today's email users are opting for other email clients, such as Thunderbird, or all-web clients, such as Google's hugely popular Gmail. These clients can be very sophisticated and, depending on what your users are doing with email, they can have a big impact on your day-to-day business process.


After everyone has an individual account, be sure to create some general accounts for different roles. For example, it’s better to create a [email protected] account than to just have that email go to a specific person (what happens if that person leaves or takes on a new role within the company?). Don’t go overboard though—having too many email accounts can get confusing for everyone.


A survey conducted (see graphic above; click to enlarge) by email marketing software provider and consulting service ReachMail Media Services of over 1,000 respondents found that varying percentages of different worker generations attempted to adhere to "inbox zero," while other generations actually preferred using their inboxes as personal information managers.

That has interesting implications: it means you can control what email gets downloaded when by having more than one account. I could separate askleo.com into two accounts, for example: one for the email addresses I want to pay attention to quickly, and the other for things that aren’t as critical. You could also segregate email based on which address it was sent to, which is what I do with my askleo.com email.
Alexandra Leslie’s interest in website administration was sparked in her teens, priming her for a fast-paced career in managing, building, and contributing to online brands, including HostingAdvice, Forbes, and the blogs of prominent hosting providers. She brings to the table firsthand experience in reviewing web hosts, perfecting website design, optimizing content, and walking site owners through the steps that add up to a successful online presence. Today, she combines her extensive writing experience with technical understanding to unpack some of the most complex topics that daunt novice website owners, as well as the subjects that excite veteran technologists within the HostingAdvice readership.
What about the time you clicked on that PayPal link that wasn't really a PayPal link? "Phishing" is a term applied to either websites or emails that pretend to be something they're not in hopes of getting a user to click on something they should have ignored. This tactis is done in hopes of then getting users to provide confidential information they would have otherwise kept to themselves, typically like passwords, financial information, or other personal data. While there are security measure that fight this, the mechanics behind phishing are, unfortunately, also consistently becoming more sophisticated. Even some dedicated antivirus and business-class hosted endpoint protection suites are having trouble keeping up. 
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