Even if you’re not running a burgeoning business, there’s the personal branding component to what an email host can offer. Maybe you’re a graduate student building your personal portfolio and publishing your resumé online when your realize Corporate Hiring Managers are less likely to respond to [email protected] Wouldn’t it be nice to reach out from [email protected] instead? Or maybe you’re establishing a side biz to bring in some extra cash. Would you rather folks considering you for freelance work reach out to [email protected] or [email protected]?
Setting up a business email address on your domain has lots of branding and administrative advantages. Think of your business email as a marketing tool – it’s likely the first impression your clients will get from you when you initiate contact. Using your domain in the email address means prospects and customers have an immediate reference point as to who you are and can search for your business online. By contrast, sending emails from a free email service such as Google or Yahoo will diminish your credibility and professionalism. 

Hard disk drives, or HDDs, are traditional storage devices that use spinning disks to house data. Solid-state drives, or SSDs, store data on microchips instead, so they can load that data much quicker. NVMe stands for Non-Volatile Memory Express, and is the latest, fastest technology that SSDs use to access data. If you need faster data read and write speeds, you should choose SSD storage, perhaps with NVMe for the very best performance. If, however, overall data capacity is a higher priority, an HDD server can still offer outstanding performance and value.
Once you get your custom email address set up, your next task is to create individual email addresses (the part before the @). Fortunately (or unfortunately, if you’re bad at making decisions), the possibilities are endless. You can use your first name, your last name, some combination of the two, generic words like “owner” or “support”, nicknames like “bossman” or “lordofemail”, or any other name you can think of.
Syntactically correct, verified email addresses do not guarantee that an email box exists. Thus many mail servers use other techniques and check the mailbox existence against relevant systems such as the Domain Name System for the domain or using callback verification to check if the mailbox exists. Callback verification is an imperfect solution, as it may be disabled to avoid a directory harvest attack.
Before registering a domain, it is necessary to choose your desired name. That is the most crucial step. Once you have done so, you can use the domain check at the top of this page to help you find out, if your website address is available or if it is already in use. In case all your preferred names are already under management, you can choose a completely new one or try another extension.

Having so much email storage means that you’ve got room for thousands of emails. Hunting for one that you need could be an issue. Our search system makes it simple to find what you’re looking for, plus it’s easy to use. And when you’re able to find things in your archives, it makes your life easier and more productive. That’s a winning combination.


Before registering a domain, it is necessary to choose your desired name. That is the most crucial step. Once you have done so, you can use the domain check at the top of this page to help you find out, if your website address is available or if it is already in use. In case all your preferred names are already under management, you can choose a completely new one or try another extension.
Hosted email often comes as part of another service, such as web hosting or Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS). Since that means there will be many extras available with these services, it's inescapable that you'll be paying for those extras in some way. Purchasing them usually means a slight uptick in that per-user price. Many businesses find that, once they're done selecting all of their needed "optional extras," their end price can often reach as high as $10 or more per user. This can start to add up for larger teams. It's somewhat like buying cable service: sometimes you need to pay for the channels you don't want to get the couple of channels that you need. There is also the old adage that "you get what you pay for" when it comes to quality. This is almost always true when considering an email host.
Running in-house email servers does provide more control and wider customization as well as tracking and compliance for small to midsize businesses (SMB). But they require specialized on-site IT staff as well as the need to manually manage and support both hardware and software. A third-party hosted email service matches many of the advantages of in-house email without the expensive initial investment. The ability to manage the number of users, access the latest security protocols, and enjoy ease of connectivity and deployment of hosted solutions makes it a viable and competitive option.
Your next major concern will be compatibility. It's not a shock that most businesses run on Microsoft Windows and use some form of Microsoft Office. Being able to use common third-party clients such as Microsoft Outlook can often be a concern, and even today, compatibility with Microsoft Outlook isn't necessarily guaranteed. This is especially true when sending and receiving meeting invites. It only takes one garbled meeting invite to realize how frustrating this can be in the real world. Even if using Microsoft Outlook isn't a concern, portability is. If the service is entirely web-based, then is there a means for me to take my email offline and send email when I connect?
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