I’ve registered a domain name at godaddy and want to set up email using that. I do not want to simply forward the email to my gmail, I want something solid set up using that domain name that is separate from gmail or any other account I use. Above, step 1 says to “Log into your blog hosting control panel, or cpanel.”? What is that? Step 1 lost me . Is that something from GoDaddy?
Nice article about how easy it is to set up an email. I do have a question though. If readers follow the steps that are outlined above, don’t your response emails say something along the lines of “sent on behalf of [email protected] by [email protected]“? This would still expose your main private email and still doesn’t look quite as professional. Wouldn’t it be better to implement google apps?

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By processing email, I mean that email directed at some address “@” (at) one of those domains is handled by a mail server or servers specifically for that domain. In fact, all the internet really knows is that “mail for this domain is is handled by that server”. Sometimes it’s the same server as the web site – for example, as I write this, mail for “askleo.com” is handled by “askleo.com”. But sometimes it’s not – mail for “hotmail.com” is actually handled by four different servers, “mx1.hotmail.com” through “mx4.hotmail.com”.
That has interesting implications: it means you can control what email gets downloaded when by having more than one account. I could separate askleo.com into two accounts, for example: one for the email addresses I want to pay attention to quickly, and the other for things that aren’t as critical. You could also segregate email based on which address it was sent to, which is what I do with my askleo.com email. 

As I said, you probably know what a domain is. “askleo.com” is a domain, as is “hotmail.com”, “microsoft.com”, and “mac.com”. Those represent business or organizations on the internet. In almost all cases, they happen to have a web site associated with them, though it’s not technically required. Similarly, they all probably process email, though again, that is not necessarily required. 

Your next major concern will be compatibility. It's not a shock that most businesses run on Microsoft Windows and use some form of Microsoft Office. Being able to use common third-party clients such as Microsoft Outlook can often be a concern, and even today, compatibility with Microsoft Outlook isn't necessarily guaranteed. This is especially true when sending and receiving meeting invites. It only takes one garbled meeting invite to realize how frustrating this can be in the real world. Even if using Microsoft Outlook isn't a concern, portability is. If the service is entirely web-based, then is there a means for me to take my email offline and send email when I connect?
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