Hosted email often comes as part of another service, such as web hosting or Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS). Since that means there will be many extras available with these services, it's inescapable that you'll be paying for those extras in some way. Purchasing them usually means a slight uptick in that per-user price. Many businesses find that, once they're done selecting all of their needed "optional extras," their end price can often reach as high as $10 or more per user. This can start to add up for larger teams. It's somewhat like buying cable service: sometimes you need to pay for the channels you don't want to get the couple of channels that you need. There is also the old adage that "you get what you pay for" when it comes to quality. This is almost always true when considering an email host.
Chances are, your one.com personalised email account is not the very first mailbox ever. If you have emails to take with you from another provider you’re using today, our email hosting platform will migrate them for you completely free of charge. This gives you the advantage of managing all your old emails in one interface, making multiple logins and passwords a thing of the past. Our built-in tool is really simple to use making the migration a doddle.
RAID stands for redundant array of independent disks. It’s a technology that distributes data across multiple storage devices to provide improved reliability. RAID 1 is a commonly implemented RAID level that mirrors data across two separate storage drives to ensure redundancy – so if one disk fails, the data remains available. Software RAID uses the host operating system to manage the RAID process, while hardware RAID uses its own dedicated hardware.

For users drowning in the flow of incoming email, one.com email offers a seamless integration with Sanebox, an advanced sorting tool to help you declutter your mailbox automatically. Its powerful algorithms go beyond spam filtering to recognize and classify different email types, so you see the most critical messages first. Here are 4 ways how Sanebox makes email management easy.
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One great way to protect data is by using email encryption. This feature can do wonders for protecting your organization's privacy and that of your employees, but it demands some investigation when you're selecting your provider. Is it built-in or do you require a third-party tool? Does it use common standards that the recipient can process? What about Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificates? Are they included or do they need to be purchased separately? The best-in-class tools will not only make encryption easy for anybody to configure and use, buy they'll also make it easy for you to understand pre-purchase.
I didn't think I'd be able to do all of this web site stuff myself, but I wanted to try to save our small business some money. Tommie walked me through the process, educating us on the right products for our business and putting up with my endless questions. He made me feel like he cared about our business and seemed excited about bringing us into the 21st century. :-) He also has quite the singing voice. I now have his version of Adele's "Hello" and Journey's "Don't Stop Believing" in my head. While I'm not overly grateful for those memories, I am grateful for his patience and expertise. Thanks, Tommie! 

Many services allow hundreds for forwarding rules or aliases to be created. Suppose John runs a small business but wants to give website visitors the confidence that they’re dealing with a solid company. He could create forwarding rules for [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], and so on, and have them all forwarded to [email protected] As John adds employees he can change the forwarding rules to go to other email addresses—you can have as many aliases as you want pointing to the same destination email.
Nice, easy to follow post Kashish. Not using an email address that represents your domain name is a lost opportunity and one of the most common mistakes that I see online. I mention this quite a bit on my blog but I’ve never created an article like this one before. I’m sending my blog readers her in the comment section of my most recent posts. Thanks! I found this at the perfect time.

When delivering email, an SMTP client, e.g., Mail User Agent (MUA), Mail Transfer Agent (MTA), uses the domain name system (DNS) to look up a Resource Record (RR) for the recipient's domain (the part of the email address to the right of the @); if there is a mail exchange Resource Record (MX record) then the returned MX record contains the name of the recipient's mailserver, otherwise the SMTP client uses an address record (A or AAAA). The MTA next connects to this server as an SMTP client. The local part of an email address has no significance for intermediate mail relay systems other than the final mailbox host. Email senders and intermediate relay systems must not assume it to be case-insensitive, since the final mailbox host may or may not treat it as such. A single mailbox may receive mail for multiple email addresses, if configured by the administrator. Conversely, a single email address may be the alias to a distribution list to many mailboxes. Email aliases, electronic mailing lists, sub-addressing, and catch-all addresses, the latter being mailboxes that receive messages regardless of the local part, are common patterns for achieving a variety of delivery goals.
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Nice article but Google Aps is the best in this case as you get a lot of other features like Google docs, calendar and others, just like a Gmail account. You can then share any docs with another gmail account holder & the database is huge for an email account. More importantly, you can create up-to 10 users & you’ll have full control over all those email accounts. It’s free, easy to integrate & no hassle. Just you need to follow what’s in http://www.google.com/a, change your MX entry from your site’s cPanel (under mail section), activate the email account from google apps, wait for a few hours & you’re done. You got your own domain email id under fast and secure google server. Good article by the way.
The basic EAI concepts involve exchanging mail in UTF-8. Though the original proposal included a downgrading mechanism for legacy systems, this has now been dropped.[31] The local servers are responsible for the local-part of the address, whereas the domain would be restricted by the rules of internationalized domain names, though still transmitted in UTF-8. The mail server is also responsible for any mapping mechanism between the IMA form and any ASCII alias.

The reason I ask is due to Barbara’s question about changing email provider as she has her own business domain, a web site and emails ending (say @xxx.com). If she changed email provider then using your analogy, then the hard-working mail team might be a team of contractors handling all her mail and then if she changes to a different provider then that would be equivalent to the old team being fired and new team of contractors put in their place. So same address, same building, same mail boy delivering it to your desk but a new mail room team. Would that be correct?


Along with specialized uses for email, you should investigate how your users are emailing on a daily basis. Email has come a long way in 40 years and the way people use it has significantly evolved. That's important because it will impact the tools and features you need to look for in your hosted email provider's client software. Sure, Microsoft Outlook is still the most popular on-site email client, but a fast-increasing number of today's email users are opting for other email clients, such as Thunderbird, or all-web clients, such as Google's hugely popular Gmail. These clients can be very sophisticated and, depending on what your users are doing with email, they can have a big impact on your day-to-day business process.
Earlier forms of email addresses on other networks than the Internet included other notations, such as that required by X.400, and the UUCP bang path notation, in which the address was given in the form of a sequence of computers through which the message should be relayed. This was widely used for several years, but was superseded by the Internet standards promulgated by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).
Nice article but Google Aps is the best in this case as you get a lot of other features like Google docs, calendar and others, just like a Gmail account. You can then share any docs with another gmail account holder & the database is huge for an email account. More importantly, you can create up-to 10 users & you’ll have full control over all those email accounts. It’s free, easy to integrate & no hassle. Just you need to follow what’s in http://www.google.com/a, change your MX entry from your site’s cPanel (under mail section), activate the email account from google apps, wait for a few hours & you’re done. You got your own domain email id under fast and secure google server. Good article by the way. 

The IETF's EAI Working group published RFC 6530 "Overview and Framework for Internationalized Email", which enabled non-ASCII characters to be used in both the local-parts and domain of an email address. RFC 6530 provides for email based on the UTF-8 encoding, which permits the full repertoire of Unicode. RFC 6531 provides a mechanism for SMTP servers to negotiate transmission of the SMTPUTF8 content.

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