Well, depending on your email provider, you can often define several different email addresses that are all delivered into the same mailbox. For example, it’s not at all uncommon for various standard email addresses like “[email protected]”, “[email protected]”, “[email protected]” and so on, to all be delivered into the same mailbox – the mailbox of the administrator for that mail server. I actually go so far as to have many email addresses on my “askleo.com” domain, but only one account. All the email on that domain is delivered to that single account. (I then use rules and filters to sort the email, based on what address it was sent to.) 

When delivering email, an SMTP client, e.g., Mail User Agent (MUA), Mail Transfer Agent (MTA), uses the domain name system (DNS) to look up a Resource Record (RR) for the recipient's domain (the part of the email address to the right of the @); if there is a mail exchange Resource Record (MX record) then the returned MX record contains the name of the recipient's mailserver, otherwise the SMTP client uses an address record (A or AAAA). The MTA next connects to this server as an SMTP client. The local part of an email address has no significance for intermediate mail relay systems other than the final mailbox host. Email senders and intermediate relay systems must not assume it to be case-insensitive, since the final mailbox host may or may not treat it as such. A single mailbox may receive mail for multiple email addresses, if configured by the administrator. Conversely, a single email address may be the alias to a distribution list to many mailboxes. Email aliases, electronic mailing lists, sub-addressing, and catch-all addresses, the latter being mailboxes that receive messages regardless of the local part, are common patterns for achieving a variety of delivery goals.
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Earlier forms of email addresses on other networks than the Internet included other notations, such as that required by X.400, and the UUCP bang path notation, in which the address was given in the form of a sequence of computers through which the message should be relayed. This was widely used for several years, but was superseded by the Internet standards promulgated by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).
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Email isn't going away any time soon. Despite a rise in adoption of collaboration-based communication platforms such as Microsoft Teams or Slack, 86 percent of professionals prefer to use email for business purposes. How companies host, store, and distribute their email—that's the area that has undergone a massive transformation. Businesses are veering away from costly onsite email servers running products such as Microsoft Small Business Server and looking instead to the cloud with hosted email solutions. Businesses of all sizes have realized the wisdom of going with a scalable and secure hosted Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) solution with guaranteed uptime that breaks down pricing into flexible, per-user charges.
Email hosting is a specialist internet hosting service which operates email servers. Hosting your email with one.com means you can benefit from premium services such as an ad-free interface, email on your own domain, spam and virus protection as well as black and white lists. Your email, calendar and contacts are also accessible via webmail in any browser, so your work can travel with you.
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The IETF's EAI Working group published RFC 6530 "Overview and Framework for Internationalized Email", which enabled non-ASCII characters to be used in both the local-parts and domain of an email address. RFC 6530 provides for email based on the UTF-8 encoding, which permits the full repertoire of Unicode. RFC 6531 provides a mechanism for SMTP servers to negotiate transmission of the SMTPUTF8 content.
I’ve registered a domain name at godaddy and want to set up email using that. I do not want to simply forward the email to my gmail, I want something solid set up using that domain name that is separate from gmail or any other account I use. Above, step 1 says to “Log into your blog hosting control panel, or cpanel.”? What is that? Step 1 lost me . Is that something from GoDaddy?
It’s pretty much common knowledge that Gmail is awesome. It’s fast, connects seamlessly with the rest of your Google services such as Drive, has a cool app called Inbox, and is overall an extremely powerful email service. However, to use it with a custom domain, you need to purchase Google Apps for either $5 or $10/month, which for casual users is a bit unnecessary. On top of that, you don’t even get all of the features a personal account gets, e.g. Inbox. 

Hosted email often comes as part of another service, such as web hosting or Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS). Since that means there will be many extras available with these services, it's inescapable that you'll be paying for those extras in some way. Purchasing them usually means a slight uptick in that per-user price. Many businesses find that, once they're done selecting all of their needed "optional extras," their end price can often reach as high as $10 or more per user. This can start to add up for larger teams. It's somewhat like buying cable service: sometimes you need to pay for the channels you don't want to get the couple of channels that you need. There is also the old adage that "you get what you pay for" when it comes to quality. This is almost always true when considering an email host.
As I said, you probably know what a domain is. “askleo.com” is a domain, as is “hotmail.com”, “microsoft.com”, and “mac.com”. Those represent business or organizations on the internet. In almost all cases, they happen to have a web site associated with them, though it’s not technically required. Similarly, they all probably process email, though again, that is not necessarily required.
It’s pretty much common knowledge that Gmail is awesome. It’s fast, connects seamlessly with the rest of your Google services such as Drive, has a cool app called Inbox, and is overall an extremely powerful email service. However, to use it with a custom domain, you need to purchase Google Apps for either $5 or $10/month, which for casual users is a bit unnecessary. On top of that, you don’t even get all of the features a personal account gets, e.g. Inbox.

A survey conducted (see graphic above; click to enlarge) by email marketing software provider and consulting service ReachMail Media Services of over 1,000 respondents found that varying percentages of different worker generations attempted to adhere to "inbox zero," while other generations actually preferred using their inboxes as personal information managers.
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