Earlier forms of email addresses on other networks than the Internet included other notations, such as that required by X.400, and the UUCP bang path notation, in which the address was given in the form of a sequence of computers through which the message should be relayed. This was widely used for several years, but was superseded by the Internet standards promulgated by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). 

The IETF's EAI Working group published RFC 6530 "Overview and Framework for Internationalized Email", which enabled non-ASCII characters to be used in both the local-parts and domain of an email address. RFC 6530 provides for email based on the UTF-8 encoding, which permits the full repertoire of Unicode. RFC 6531 provides a mechanism for SMTP servers to negotiate transmission of the SMTPUTF8 content.
Bandwidth consumption over the last several years has shifted from a per megabit usage model to a per gigabyte usage model. Bandwidth was traditionally measured in line speed access that included the ability to purchase needed megabits at a given monthly cost. As the shared hosting model developed, the trend towards gigabyte or total bytes transferred, replaced the megabit line speed model so dedicated server providers started offering per gigabyte.
You can certainly do that, but it’s often a lot of effort. Not sure it it’s worth it. Even when you narrow it down to one contact – it may not be that one contact at all, but something about his or her email provider, the path to that email provider or something else. It’s difficult (and inadvisable) to point fingers. On the other hand, it’s fairly common when signing up for mailing lists, or leaving comments on web sites that require an email address to use a specific email address to see if THEY end up spamming you. People use Ask Leo! – specific email addresses when leaving comments all the time. (And, no, I don’t spam ’em 🙂 ).
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You can certainly do that, but it’s often a lot of effort. Not sure it it’s worth it. Even when you narrow it down to one contact – it may not be that one contact at all, but something about his or her email provider, the path to that email provider or something else. It’s difficult (and inadvisable) to point fingers. On the other hand, it’s fairly common when signing up for mailing lists, or leaving comments on web sites that require an email address to use a specific email address to see if THEY end up spamming you. People use Ask Leo! – specific email addresses when leaving comments all the time. (And, no, I don’t spam ’em 🙂 ).
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Things are probably more complicated than that, though. As a recent survey conducted by market research firm Statista clearly shows, email is one of the most popular apps for mobile devices across most organizations and even consumers. Given how many workflows, business processes, and just plain important communications take place over email, this is one area where you likely shouldn't skimp.
Verification links: Email address validation is often accomplished for account creation on websites by sending an email to the user-provided email address with a special temporary hyperlink. On receipt, the user opens the link, immediately activating the account. Email addresses are also useful as means of forwarding messages from a website, e.g., user messages, user actions, to the email inbox.

A survey conducted (see graphic above; click to enlarge) by email marketing software provider and consulting service ReachMail Media Services of over 1,000 respondents found that varying percentages of different worker generations attempted to adhere to "inbox zero," while other generations actually preferred using their inboxes as personal information managers.

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