It’s pretty much common knowledge that Gmail is awesome. It’s fast, connects seamlessly with the rest of your Google services such as Drive, has a cool app called Inbox, and is overall an extremely powerful email service. However, to use it with a custom domain, you need to purchase Google Apps for either $5 or $10/month, which for casual users is a bit unnecessary. On top of that, you don’t even get all of the features a personal account gets, e.g. Inbox.

I used godaddy for a few years but grew tired of constant price hikes not to mention how difficult it was to edit my site. My site was deleted when I canceled my subscription and I can’t use my web site name unless I want to fork over almost $200. I don’t need online ordering as I’m a small home bakery, I don’t need one email address let alone 10, I just want an online presence so customers can find me. However, I want to be sure I’m buying something I can work with easily. Any suggestions?


Well, depending on your email provider, you can often define several different email addresses that are all delivered into the same mailbox. For example, it’s not at all uncommon for various standard email addresses like “[email protected]”, “[email protected]”, “[email protected]” and so on, to all be delivered into the same mailbox – the mailbox of the administrator for that mail server. I actually go so far as to have many email addresses on my “askleo.com” domain, but only one account. All the email on that domain is delivered to that single account. (I then use rules and filters to sort the email, based on what address it was sent to.)
Buying a cheap domain name does not limit your ability to be successful online. In fact, the hundreds of new domain extensions now available provides you with more opportunities to create a strong online presence. Choosing the right cheap domain can be a way to communicate your website’s purpose and your creativity, innovation, and even customer service to online visitors. A book club, for example, could use a .club domain name to bring members together online. Online stores might want to look into .shop, while IT firms should consider .tech domains. In short, there are NUMEROUS possibilities, and the smart selection of a cheap domain name can lead to creative marketing opportunities and strong user engagement.
Now you know that a good domain does not have to cost a fortune. Both great website traffic and name recognition are possible when you purchase a cheap domain name and build a quality website. And GoDaddy is here to help you do just that. We offer the largest selection of domain names on the web, so you can pick a domain that is memorable and specific to you. We make domain setup quick and easy and provide you with the option to add services like Business Protection. Want to purchase more than one cheap domain? Then consider our bulk registration to quickly register numerous domain variations at once.
Dedicated hosting server providers utilize extreme security measures to ensure the safety of data stored on their network of servers. Providers will often deploy various software programs for scanning systems and networks for obtrusive invaders, spammers, hackers, and other harmful problems such as Trojans, worms, and crashers (Sending multiple connections). Linux and Windows use different software for security protection.

Finally, choosing email hosting with one.com means you don’t have to worry about losing your emails. With Backup & Restore you can easily recover lost data, so you can be assured that all your important data is protected. We store backup copies of all your emails and attachments for up to 14 days for free as long as your emails are hosted on our servers.


Yes. If you currently have a VPS hosting account with us, you can upgrade to our dedicated hosting at any time by ordering a new server. For fully managed customers, we will migrate your data from your current account to your new server. You can also upgrade either your VPS or your dedicated server with Premium DNS, which improves both your security and performance.
The transmission of electronic mail within the Internet uses the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP), defined in RFC 5321 and 5322, and extensions like RFC 6531. The mailboxes may be accessed and managed by users with the Post Office Protocol (POP) or the Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) with email client software that runs on a personal computer, mobile device, or with webmail systems that render the messages on a screen or on paper printouts.

It’s pretty much common knowledge that Gmail is awesome. It’s fast, connects seamlessly with the rest of your Google services such as Drive, has a cool app called Inbox, and is overall an extremely powerful email service. However, to use it with a custom domain, you need to purchase Google Apps for either $5 or $10/month, which for casual users is a bit unnecessary. On top of that, you don’t even get all of the features a personal account gets, e.g. Inbox.
Nice article about how easy it is to set up an email. I do have a question though. If readers follow the steps that are outlined above, don’t your response emails say something along the lines of “sent on behalf of [email protected] by [email protected]“? This would still expose your main private email and still doesn’t look quite as professional. Wouldn’t it be better to implement google apps?
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GoDaddy’s $1-hosting plans are an absolute steal in affordable email hosting. You may already know them as the world’s top domain name registrar, and they’re known throughout the industry for their domain, email, and shared hosting plans. With award-winning customer support, unlimited email accounts, and simple setup options, GoDaddy is the leader in cheap email hosting.
An example here is the rapidly growing trend of "inbox zero." It's actually known by a variety of names, but it refers to the practice of keeping your email inbox count at zero stored emails. Essentially, it's dealing with every email as it comes in and then deleting or archiving each one so that your inbox is always empty. This boils down to a fundamental shift in how users are utilizing their email inboxes. 

You can take it one step further and add the original email address (the domain one) as a “Send mail as” address under Mail Settings > Accounts and Import. This means that when you reply to an email you received at that address then it goes back from that address. This means that people feel more secure too, as it’s always odd to send an email and have it replied to from a different address – and sometimes somewhat suspicious.
GoDaddy’s $1-hosting plans are an absolute steal in affordable email hosting. You may already know them as the world’s top domain name registrar, and they’re known throughout the industry for their domain, email, and shared hosting plans. With award-winning customer support, unlimited email accounts, and simple setup options, GoDaddy is the leader in cheap email hosting.

I didn't think I'd be able to do all of this web site stuff myself, but I wanted to try to save our small business some money. Tommie walked me through the process, educating us on the right products for our business and putting up with my endless questions. He made me feel like he cared about our business and seemed excited about bringing us into the 21st century. :-) He also has quite the singing voice. I now have his version of Adele's "Hello" and Journey's "Don't Stop Believing" in my head. While I'm not overly grateful for those memories, I am grateful for his patience and expertise. Thanks, Tommie!
Well, depending on your email provider, you can often define several different email addresses that are all delivered into the same mailbox. For example, it’s not at all uncommon for various standard email addresses like “[email protected]”, “[email protected]”, “[email protected]” and so on, to all be delivered into the same mailbox – the mailbox of the administrator for that mail server. I actually go so far as to have many email addresses on my “askleo.com” domain, but only one account. All the email on that domain is delivered to that single account. (I then use rules and filters to sort the email, based on what address it was sent to.)
The cloud certainly makes delivering email to your users easier but, for the vast majority of organizations, there's still going to be some setup required beyond simply activating the service. At a minimum, a domain must be purchased and configured to point to the new email host. The service provider can make this process very simple or they can make quite hard; this is something you should watch for in the provider's customer support forums as well as in our reviews. In most cases, there is a validation phase that will require some technical familiarity, though a few providers go so far as to walk even neophyte users through it step by step. Other solid services bolster excellent support with tutorial articles and videos that also walk you through the process. The worst will leave you to figure it out on your own.

Email hosting is a specialist internet hosting service which operates email servers. Hosting your email with one.com means you can benefit from premium services such as an ad-free interface, email on your own domain, spam and virus protection as well as black and white lists. Your email, calendar and contacts are also accessible via webmail in any browser, so your work can travel with you.
Data protection is another key email security concern. Inboxes often contain GBs of business-critical and personal data, so not just hackers but also legitimate marketing companies can make big money off mining email data—and this sometimes includes the very company that is providing the email service to you. Fortunately, most companies, including your hosting provider, are pretty good about keeping out of private data, but it's important to be aware of when these policies have failed. Security breaches are commonplace and it's important to know how your data is being managed. To protect yourself, be sure to inquire about data safety capabilities on the provider's side, especially around encryption and malware scanning. But be sure to implement additional measures on your side, as well, including encryption for those using local email clients as well as deploying personal virtual private networks (VPNs) to folks accessing their email from multiple locations.

The reason I ask is due to Barbara’s question about changing email provider as she has her own business domain, a web site and emails ending (say @xxx.com). If she changed email provider then using your analogy, then the hard-working mail team might be a team of contractors handling all her mail and then if she changes to a different provider then that would be equivalent to the old team being fired and new team of contractors put in their place. So same address, same building, same mail boy delivering it to your desk but a new mail room team. Would that be correct?
Despite the wide range of special characters which are technically valid, organisations, mail services, mail servers and mail clients in practice often do not accept all of them. For example, Windows Live Hotmail only allows creation of email addresses using alphanumerics, dot (.), underscore (_) and hyphen (-).[11] Common advice is to avoid using some special characters to avoid the risk of rejected emails.[12]
Within 24 hrs, the invoice was updated to me by email which I thought was sent by him because that email was sent in the same thread that we used to use with my supplier. The invoice looks exactly the same with the first except the bank account mentioned inside them are different. However, I didn’t notice that and transfered the money to the account of the fraudster.
Your next major concern will be compatibility. It's not a shock that most businesses run on Microsoft Windows and use some form of Microsoft Office. Being able to use common third-party clients such as Microsoft Outlook can often be a concern, and even today, compatibility with Microsoft Outlook isn't necessarily guaranteed. This is especially true when sending and receiving meeting invites. It only takes one garbled meeting invite to realize how frustrating this can be in the real world. Even if using Microsoft Outlook isn't a concern, portability is. If the service is entirely web-based, then is there a means for me to take my email offline and send email when I connect?
That has interesting implications: it means you can control what email gets downloaded when by having more than one account. I could separate askleo.com into two accounts, for example: one for the email addresses I want to pay attention to quickly, and the other for things that aren’t as critical. You could also segregate email based on which address it was sent to, which is what I do with my askleo.com email.
Forwarded email addresses are sometimes called “aliases”. An alias, as you know, is another name that refers to a given person. In our example, John has an email address with gmail—[email protected] He has just purchased the domain name widgets.com and sets up a forwarding rule which “reads”: Whenever an email comes in to [email protected], forward that email to [email protected] In this case, the address [email protected] is an “alias” for [email protected], as all email goes to the same Gmail address.
Your next major concern will be compatibility. It's not a shock that most businesses run on Microsoft Windows and use some form of Microsoft Office. Being able to use common third-party clients such as Microsoft Outlook can often be a concern, and even today, compatibility with Microsoft Outlook isn't necessarily guaranteed. This is especially true when sending and receiving meeting invites. It only takes one garbled meeting invite to realize how frustrating this can be in the real world. Even if using Microsoft Outlook isn't a concern, portability is. If the service is entirely web-based, then is there a means for me to take my email offline and send email when I connect?
You can certainly do that, but it’s often a lot of effort. Not sure it it’s worth it. Even when you narrow it down to one contact – it may not be that one contact at all, but something about his or her email provider, the path to that email provider or something else. It’s difficult (and inadvisable) to point fingers. On the other hand, it’s fairly common when signing up for mailing lists, or leaving comments on web sites that require an email address to use a specific email address to see if THEY end up spamming you. People use Ask Leo! – specific email addresses when leaving comments all the time. (And, no, I don’t spam ’em 🙂 ).
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Support for any of these operating systems typically depends on the level of management offered with a particular dedicated server plan. Operating system support may include updates to the core system in order to acquire the latest security fixes, patches, and system-wide vulnerability resolutions. Updates to core operating systems include kernel upgrades, service packs, application updates, and security patches that keep the server secure and safe. Operating system updates and support relieves the burden of server management from the dedicated server owner.
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