Interpretation of the local part of an email address is dependent on the conventions and policies implemented in the mail server. For example, case sensitivity may distinguish mailboxes differing only in capitalization of characters of the local-part, although this is not very common.[13] Apart from work, school, or organization addresses, gmail ignores all dots in the local-part for the purposes of determining account identity.[14] This prevents the creation of user accounts your.user.name or yourusername when the account your.username already exists.


Many services allow hundreds for forwarding rules or aliases to be created. Suppose John runs a small business but wants to give website visitors the confidence that they’re dealing with a solid company. He could create forwarding rules for [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], and so on, and have them all forwarded to [email protected] As John adds employees he can change the forwarding rules to go to other email addresses—you can have as many aliases as you want pointing to the same destination email.
Most companies will prefer a third-party solution since not only will these be more capable, they'll also be supported more effectively by related back-end apps, such as mobile device management (MDM) platforms and mobile-oriented endpoint protection solutions. You'll also have an easier time pushing a third-party platform out to registered client devices, though some hosted email providers can help with this step.
Alexandra Leslie’s interest in website administration was sparked in her teens, priming her for a fast-paced career in managing, building, and contributing to online brands, including HostingAdvice, Forbes, and the blogs of prominent hosting providers. She brings to the table firsthand experience in reviewing web hosts, perfecting website design, optimizing content, and walking site owners through the steps that add up to a successful online presence. Today, she combines her extensive writing experience with technical understanding to unpack some of the most complex topics that daunt novice website owners, as well as the subjects that excite veteran technologists within the HostingAdvice readership.
One stop shopping for getting a website up and running - get the name, register it, build the site and they host it, all in one spot. The builder tool is amazingly easy to use - so much easier than any of the others I have used! You get to do all the fun parts, and they take care of all the drudgery in the background. Great help videos and articles, and their phone customer support is just amazing - really nice peeps who know what they are doing, and take the time to make sure your tangles are straightened. Brilliant all the way around.
Earlier forms of email addresses on other networks than the Internet included other notations, such as that required by X.400, and the UUCP bang path notation, in which the address was given in the form of a sequence of computers through which the message should be relayed. This was widely used for several years, but was superseded by the Internet standards promulgated by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). 

Earlier forms of email addresses on other networks than the Internet included other notations, such as that required by X.400, and the UUCP bang path notation, in which the address was given in the form of a sequence of computers through which the message should be relayed. This was widely used for several years, but was superseded by the Internet standards promulgated by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).

Addresses of this form, using various separators between the base name and the tag, are supported by several email services, including Runbox (plus), Gmail (plus),[16] Rackspace Email (plus), Yahoo! Mail Plus (hyphen),[17] Apple's iCloud (plus), Outlook.com (plus),[18] ProtonMail (plus),[19] FastMail (plus and Subdomain Addressing),[20] MMDF (equals), Qmail and Courier Mail Server (hyphen).[21][22] Postfix and Exim allow configuring an arbitrary separator from the legal character set.[23][24]


As I said, you probably know what a domain is. “askleo.com” is a domain, as is “hotmail.com”, “microsoft.com”, and “mac.com”. Those represent business or organizations on the internet. In almost all cases, they happen to have a web site associated with them, though it’s not technically required. Similarly, they all probably process email, though again, that is not necessarily required.
Your next major concern will be compatibility. It's not a shock that most businesses run on Microsoft Windows and use some form of Microsoft Office. Being able to use common third-party clients such as Microsoft Outlook can often be a concern, and even today, compatibility with Microsoft Outlook isn't necessarily guaranteed. This is especially true when sending and receiving meeting invites. It only takes one garbled meeting invite to realize how frustrating this can be in the real world. Even if using Microsoft Outlook isn't a concern, portability is. If the service is entirely web-based, then is there a means for me to take my email offline and send email when I connect?
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