I’ve registered a domain name at godaddy and want to set up email using that. I do not want to simply forward the email to my gmail, I want something solid set up using that domain name that is separate from gmail or any other account I use. Above, step 1 says to “Log into your blog hosting control panel, or cpanel.”? What is that? Step 1 lost me . Is that something from GoDaddy?
For email marketers and email newsletter senders, the email domain will generally correspond with their website. This allows recipients to easily identify who the mail is coming from, or to easily reach the website. In other cases, recipients may be able to use a simple, straightforward email domain to reach a catch all mailbox in the case that they are unsure of their intended recipient’s email prefix.

You will need to verify that you own the domain you listed during registration. In this example, we’ll show you how to verify your domain with Bluehost, but if you purchased your domain from another provider, the steps will be similar. First, generate and copy your CNAME code (a code used to connect one domain to another) and destination values (a designation for the server associated with your email domain). Then, plug them into them into your Bluehost zone editor.
You could think of the sites that share your server as your roommates; there's really not that much separating you from them. Sure, you can close the bedroom door, but they can still cause nightmares for you in the kitchen and the bathroom. In web hosting terms, all the sites share a single server's resources, so huge traffic spike on Site A may impact the neighboring sites' performances. It's even possible that another site could take down the shared server altogether, if it crashed hard enough.
A short, one-word name (ex. cat.com), and especially .com domains, will be pricy because simple titles have a lot of potential uses, meaning people probably already check them out on their own. If you are going after a registered .com domain, you will have to contact the current owner, and even then, prices could be high for misspellings and multiple word domains. In the past years, companies and individuals have settled for bizarre names, misspellings, and old tricks like adding “the” or “my” to the front; note, however, that this will also reduce domain performance.
Moving to another website consists of transferring the website’s files and databases, configuring your site with the new host, and directing your domain’s DNS to the new host. Once you pick a new site host, they can usually help you out with this process. The cost will depend on the host you’re switching to, but it can range anywhere from $150-$400.
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