Typically, a web hosting service gives you the option of selecting either a traditional hard drive or a solid-state drive as your website's storage medium. Traditional hard drives have large capacities and lower prices, but they aren't quite as resilient as their SSD counterparts. Solid-state drives, on the other hand, are often faster and more reliable than HDDs, but they cost more and have smaller storage capacities. Unless you truly need blazing speed, a traditional hard drive should get the job done.
That has interesting implications: it means you can control what email gets downloaded when by having more than one account. I could separate askleo.com into two accounts, for example: one for the email addresses I want to pay attention to quickly, and the other for things that aren’t as critical. You could also segregate email based on which address it was sent to, which is what I do with my askleo.com email.

Most business owners think that buying an expensive domain name guarantees traffic and recognition of their site. However, it is easy to get a cheap domain name that is equally reliable: simply choose us as your registrar. Before registering your domain, it is necessary, and crucial, to choose a desired name. Once you have done so, you can use the search tools (like the domain checker at the top of this page) to help you check whether your domain name is available or if it is already in use. In case all your preferred names are already reserved, you can choose a completely new one or try another domain extension. There are different ways in order to get a domain. You can register the domain name directly or you can select a web hosting package.
I’d love to know how this works. I know only enough to sorta pay for my .com (website[?]or hosting, or domain) but almost always, even when I renew, for seemingly NO reason I can tell, I have to call them within the next day or so. because shortly after renewing my existing domain as well as when I fall for those dumb ads to upsell me all the way through to checkout, I can barely/hardly tell what it is that I’m paying for, much less what it does/if I want/need it/can I even afford it? Because I need something that it CHEAP and is just the following:
That would be an extra layer of security but with a few hundred accounts requiring passwords, you’d need hundreds of email accounts and you’d have to check your emails for those accounts at least once every 3 months or more often to keep those email accounts alive or you risk not having a recovery email address for those main accounts. Although, your idea might be useful for a few of your most important accounts like your bank, Facebook etc.
Yes, you can type “free website hosting” into a search engine of your choice, and you will get results. Don’t do it. At best, you will be stuck with shoddy service, semi-reliable uptime, and ridiculously short-lived storage and bandwidth capacities. The free options out there will frustrate you, and putting yourself through that makes zero sense when you can have quality hosting for as little as $2 a month.
This is unfortunate because, these days, owning a website is becoming a crucial part of running a successful business, and more and more folks are establishing a web presence for their personal brand as well. You can use hosting to sell online, store and share your portfolio, or even publish your freelance writing samples and resumé. Yet, even the basics — What is web hosting? — can be lost on the average web user.
×